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  /  Tech   /  Daily-Briefs   /  Nokia And Angola Cables Deploy World’s First Optical Connection Between the US And Africa
Nokia And Angola Cables Deploys World’s First Optical Connection Between the US And Africa

Nokia And Angola Cables Deploy World’s First Optical Connection Between the US And Africa

In January 2020, Nokia announced that it is partnering with Angola Cables to trial Photonic Service Engine (PSE-3) chipset. This will be used for the first-ever direct optical connection between the US and Africa.

 

This tech will marry low-latency with more bandwidth. In a YouTube video, posted on 19th May 2020, Nokia announced that they have successfully deployed the connection. According to a statement from the company, the aim of this is to improve access to content for customers in Africa. It will also give better user experiences. See video of the announcement below:

 

 

Global internet has always depended on subsea fiber-optic cables. It is important because it connects countries and continents and covers ‘vast trans-oceanic distances’. Therefore, to get an optical connection between the US and Africa, Nokia and Angola Cables made use of two pre-existing subsea cable systems during their trails early this year.

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One of the systems is the SACS (South Atlantic Cable System) which connects Fortaleza, Brazil and Luanda. Angola Cables manages the SACS. The other system is owned by MONET that connects Santos/Fortaleza with Florida/USA.

 

Then, to deploy the wavelengths, the companies used a Nokia’s 1830 Photonic Service Interconnect (PSI) data center interconnect (DCI) platform that uses PSE-3. According to probabilistic constellation shaping (PCS), the optical wavelengths reached an optimal speed of 300 Gigabits per second. The cable was 12,635 km long.

 

The need for the test, and now the project, was to be better able to cater for the growing amount of internet users in Africa. During the commencement of the project, executives from both Nokia and Angola Cables had agreed that it would help deliver enhanced services to Africans.

 

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A reader of books and stringer of words. Passionate about Science and Tech. When not writing or reading he is surfing the web and Tweeting.

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